The Sanctity of Human Life: Matt Chandler

You may have seen the excerpt from a great sermon Matt Chandler gave on abortion.  It’s “gone viral” on social media, and while the excerpt is very good, the parts that come before and after are just as good, including a gracious application of the gospel for those who have encouraged or had an abortion.  Here’s the clip, and at bottom of post is a link to the full sermon.

Matt raises a siege of good argumentation, and undermines the most common pro-choice arguments and mantra’s such as “A woman’s right to choose” and the ever present smokescreen, “What about [enter rare, tragic situation]?” Matt rightly calls abortion “murder for convenience.”

As horrific a statement that is, Matt draws our attention to God’s grace in the gospel.

There is no sin with more power than the cross of Jesus Christ, not even the one we’re talking about today. If this had more power than the cross, we wouldn’t be talking about it. If this got to define you, we wouldn’t be talking about it. This doesn’t define you because Christ’s forgiveness will define you.

Matt situates us in history with this:

Okay, so let me do this. I don’t know if it’s going to happen, but it seems like because science is so on our side on this, it will only be a matter of time until Roe v. Wade has to be overturned. With that said, God has almost always accomplished social change through the outcry of his people who are against the world for the sake of the world. I think there are these defining moments of history that, as we look back on history, we kind of wish we could have been there. We wish we would have fought alongside, right?

Matt outlines 4 things we must now do to see Roe vs. Wade overturned.

  1. Repent of our indifference.  “Abortion ends a life, so what do you want me to do about it?”  That’s our indifference in action.
  2. Pray because this is no longer a rational issue, it’s a spiritual one.  The science is clear that a human life is destroyed through abortion, but our opponents now turn a deaf ear to that. They don’t care.
  3. This issue should inform how we vote. Does that make us a single-issue voter? 54 million abortions since 1974 should make this an issue to single out.
  4. Get involved. Matt provides concrete ways we can work for the sanctity of life.

The Sanctity of Human Life >>>

Campus Outreach National Conference 2011

As 2011 transitioned into the new year, Campus Outreach was holding their national conference for college students in Chattanooga, Tennessee.  This year’s subject was “One Life,” enjoy it, transform it, share it, multiply it, don’t waste it, you get the idea. Among the multitude of speakers were John Piper and Matt Chandler.

Campus Outreach Conference >>>

Together for the Gospel 2010

This years T4G (or T4TG as R. C. Sproul suggests it should be renamed) was a great conference.  Powerful and thought provoking messages from almost all the speakers.

Dever’s message on the church putting the Gospel on display was quintessential Dever.

Sproul was phenomenal (even though C.J. didn’t understand it). He looked at how philosophy and the German higher critics deviated from the Gospel, and demonstrated how their mistakes are being embraced today. This was one of the best lectures I’ve ever heard about theological liberalism.

Mohler, as in the last T4G, looks at how our current Christian cultures evangelical zeal often undermines the Gospel itself.

In the same vein, Thabiti unmasks the problem clearly about how the contemporary evangelical fixation with cultural engagement is a disastrous derailment of the Gospel.

MacArthur’s theology of sleep is a theology of the Gospel, because ultimately the salvation of the unbeliever is a work of God, not a work of man, and that allows him to sleep at night. The Arminian gospel so prevalent today, if taken to it’s logical conclusion, should drive us insane because it makes salvation dependent upon us.

Piper, well, what can you say about Piper?

Ligon Duncan makes a great case for why we need to be reading the original sources of the early church fathers, and helps us to navigate the criticisms brought upon them.  Quite an eye-opener.

Matt Chandler talks briefly and movingly about how his efforts to prepare his people for suffering was God’s way of preparing him for his brain cancer. Matt, as always, has very amusing ways of getting across solid theology.

C.J., well, is C.J. talking about his favorite subject, ordinary pastors.

T4G 2010 >>>

Breakout Sessions >>>

The Story of Matt Chandler

9 Marks Mark Dever interviews Matt Chandler about his life and ministry.  As to be expected, this is a terrific interview filled with a lot of helpful material. Matt talks at length about how he took his pastorate at the Village Church and began a ministry of church recovery (as opposed to church planting).

Matt made one insightful observation I’ve not heard before, and that is that the Christian church today is very much like the Anabaptists of centuries past, who popularized the idea “All I need is me and my Bible”.  This distorted individualism is very prevalent in the church today.

The Story of Matt Chandler >>>